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We grow, sell, and ship, some of the best Hosta in the industry all in the beautiful USA. We ship quickly through USPS Priority Mail.


Plants are shipped out on Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and sometimes on Saturdays....Most plants will be sent bare root wrapped in wet sphagnum moss and a plastic bag wrapped in tape for security, and sent via USPS Priority Mail. When plants arrive be sure and soak in water overnight and then plant. I take great care in wrapping plants to assure they arrive safely, but sometimes the Post Office gets careless and damages the package(See “Damage” under shipping) I only ship plants to lower 48 states, Alaska, Hawaii, U.S. Protectorates, and APO/FPO address no international shipping at this time, but am working on same on a country by country basis, so email me with any requests! If there are any certificates or special shipping costs above and beyond what normally occurs in my regular shipping to the lower 48 states...buyer is responsible to tell me and pay any additional costs incurred. Please immediately email or call me upon arrival of shipment, for any problems that you think might have occurred. John Talbott

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HOSTA 'AUGUST MOON'-Large Yellow White bloom lavender blush Z 3-9
Base Price: $8.95

Hosta is the most popular perennial in America. Clump-forming, herbaceous, landscaping mainstay.  Recommended for dense shade in southern zones and light to dense shade for norther zones. Hosta are versatile East Asian natives with lush foliage in diverse colors, heights, and textures. Perennials.  Sun-Shade: Mostly Sunny to Full Shade Soil Condition: Normal, Acidic.  Zones 3-9.
                                                                                         What are Hosta "eyes"?
When you buy a Hosta "bare-root", you will usually receive 1 or 2 eye plants. Each eye will grow into a full plant.
In the spring, you can gently uncover your hosta beds to reveal the green nubs poking through the soil. Each nub is called an eye, and it is the beginning of a complete set of hosta leaves. Eyes can be divided, but it is not necessary.
When you move or divide hostas, it can take a year or so for them to be completely reestablished.

Hosta (originally named Funkia) is a genus of 23-40 species of lily-like plants native to northeast Asia. It was once classified in the family Liliaceae but is now (due to the Angiosperm Phylogeny Group) included in the family Agavaceae. Hosta are herbaceous perennial plants that grow from corms or rhizomes. Their broad lanceolate (lance-shaped) or ovate leaves vary widely in size, by species, from 1-15 inches long and 3/4 - 12 inches broad. Variation among the numerous cultivars is even greater, with clumps ranging from less than four inches across to more than 6 1/2 feet across.

Wild Hosta species’ leaf color is typically green, although some (e.g. H. sieboldiana) are known for their glaucous coating that lends leaves a blue appearance. There are natural sports (mutations) of native species that have yellow-green (“gold") colored leaves or differing leaf variegation (centers/edges are either white/cream or yellowish). The (3/4- to 2-inch long) flowers are produced on (up to 31-inch tall) erect panicles: they are usually pendulous with six petals, scentless, and white, lavender, or violet in color.

Hostas are widely cultivated groundcovers, and they are particularly useful as shade-tolerant plants. Hybridization has produced over 5000 cultivars: those with golden- or white-variegated leaves are especially prized. They require little care (other than watering and some fertilizer) and are generally easy, long-lived and relatively disease free.

Starting in May we sometimes cut much of the top foliage off our Hostas before shipping. We feel that the tops are too big to be supported by the roots after transplanting, they tend to just lay over on the ground and not recuperate...if we have not cut them back and they start to wilt simply cut them.  When the plants are smaller we leave the tops on.    The genus name Hosta is after the Austrian physician & botanist Nicholas Host (1761-1834).

HOSTA 'AUGUST MOON'-Large Yellow White bloom lavender blush Z 3-9

Large, yellow with puckered leaf texture.  Enjoys morning sun, 4-6 hours. White Flower with lavender blush, bloom time: Summer to Late Summer  Mature size 24" x 42".
Funkia, Plantain Lily.
FORTUNEI 'AUREO MARGINATA' Medium, green with yellow margins. Lavender flowers Z 3-9
Base Price: $8.95

Hosta is the most popular perennial in America. Clump-forming, herbaceous, landscaping mainstay.  Recommended for dense shade in southern zones and light to dense shade for norther zones. Hosta are versatile East Asian natives with lush foliage in diverse colors, heights, and textures. Perennials.  Sun-Shade: Mostly Sunny to Full Shade Soil Condition: Normal, Acidic.  Zones 3-9.
                                                                                         What are Hosta "eyes"?
When you buy a Hosta "bare-root", you will usually receive 1 or 2 eye plants. Each eye will grow into a full plant.
In the spring, you can gently uncover your hosta beds to reveal the green nubs poking through the soil. Each nub is called an eye, and it is the beginning of a complete set of hosta leaves. Eyes can be divided, but it is not necessary.
When you move or divide hostas, it can take a year or so for them to be completely reestablished.

Hosta (originally named Funkia) is a genus of 23-40 species of lily-like plants native to northeast Asia. It was once classified in the family Liliaceae but is now (due to the Angiosperm Phylogeny Group) included in the family Agavaceae. Hosta are herbaceous perennial plants that grow from corms or rhizomes. Their broad lanceolate (lance-shaped) or ovate leaves vary widely in size, by species, from 1-15 inches long and 3/4 - 12 inches broad. Variation among the numerous cultivars is even greater, with clumps ranging from less than four inches across to more than 6 1/2 feet across.

Wild Hosta species’ leaf color is typically green, although some (e.g. H. sieboldiana) are known for their glaucous coating that lends leaves a blue appearance. There are natural sports (mutations) of native species that have yellow-green (“gold") colored leaves or differing leaf variegation (centers/edges are either white/cream or yellowish). The (3/4- to 2-inch long) flowers are produced on (up to 31-inch tall) erect panicles: they are usually pendulous with six petals, scentless, and white, lavender, or violet in color.

Hostas are widely cultivated groundcovers, and they are particularly useful as shade-tolerant plants. Hybridization has produced over 5000 cultivars: those with golden- or white-variegated leaves are especially prized. They require little care (other than watering and some fertilizer) and are generally easy, long-lived and relatively disease free.

Starting in May we sometimes cut much of the top foliage off our Hostas before shipping. We feel that the tops are too big to be supported by the roots after transplanting, they tend to just lay over on the ground and not recuperate...if we have not cut them back and they start to wilt simply cut them.  When the plants are smaller we leave the tops on.    The genus name Hosta is after the Austrian physician & botanist Nicholas Host (1761-1834).

FORTUNEI 'AUREO MARGINATA' Medium, green with yellow margins. Lavender flowers Z 3-9

Medium, green with yellow margins. Hlds color all season, Lavender Flowers.  Mature size 18" x 24"
HOSTA HALCYON-MEDIUM SIZED, BLUE LEAVES PALE LILAC BLOOMS Z 3-9
Base Price: $8.95

HOSTA HALCYON-MEDIUM SIZED, BLUE LEAVES PALE LILAC BLOOMS Z 3-9

Type: Perennials
Height: Medium 18" (28" in flower) (Plant 20" apart)
Bloom Time: Summer to Late Summer
Sun-Shade: Mostly Sunny to Full Shade

Soil Condition: Normal, Acidic
Flower Color / Accent: Lavender / Lavender
Hosta Halycon is medium sized blue selection that holds its leaf color long into summer. Pointed, oval-shaped, heavily-textured foliage adds to the attractive mounding shape. Pale lilac bell-shaped flowers are followed by seed heads that are attractive to birds.


Hosta is the most popular perennial in America. Clump-forming, herbaceous, landscaping mainstay. Recommended for dense shade in southern zones and light to dense shade for norther zones. Hosta are versatile East Asian natives with lush foliage in diverse colors, heights, and textures. Perennials. Sun-Shade: Mostly Sunny to Full Shade Soil Condition: Normal, Acidic. Zones 3-9. What are Hosta "eyes"? When you buy a Hosta "bare-root", you will usually receive 1 or 2 eye plants. Each eye will grow into a full plant. In the spring, you can gently uncover your hosta beds to reveal the green nubs poking through the soil. Each nub is called an eye, and it is the beginning of a complete set of hosta leaves. Eyes can be divided, but it is not necessary. When you move or divide hostas, it can take a year or so for them to be completely reestablished. Hosta (originally named Funkia) is a genus of 23-40 species of lily-like plants native to northeast Asia. It was once classified in the family Liliaceae but is now (due to the Angiosperm Phylogeny Group) included in the family Agavaceae. Hosta are herbaceous perennial plants that grow from corms or rhizomes. Their broad lanceolate (lance-shaped) or ovate leaves vary widely in size, by species, from 1-15 inches long and 3/4 - 12 inches broad. Variation among the numerous cultivars is even greater, with clumps ranging from less than four inches across to more than 6 1/2 feet across. Wild Hosta species’ leaf color is typically green, although some (e.g. H. sieboldiana) are known for their glaucous coating that lends leaves a blue appearance. There are natural sports (mutations) of native species that have yellow-green (“gold") colored leaves or differing leaf variegation (centers/edges are either white/cream or yellowish). The (3/4- to 2-inch long) flowers are produced on (up to 31-inch tall) erect panicles: they are usually pendulous with six petals, scentless, and white, lavender, or violet in color. Hostas are widely cultivated groundcovers, and they are particularly useful as shade-tolerant plants. Hybridization has produced over 5000 cultivars: those with golden- or white-variegated leaves are especially prized. They require little care (other than watering and some fertilizer) and are generally easy, long-lived and relatively disease free. Starting in May we sometimes cut much of the top foliage off our Hostas before shipping. We feel that the tops are too big to be supported by the roots after transplanting, they tend to just lay over on the ground and not recuperate...if we have not cut them back and they start to wilt simply cut them. When the plants are smaller we leave the tops on. The genus name Hosta is after the Austrian physician & botanist Nicholas Host (1761-1834).
HOSTA ‘FRANCEE’ LARGE VARIEGATED LEAVES WITH LAVENDER BLOOMS Z 3-9
Base Price: $8.95

Hosta is the most popular perennial in America. Clump-forming, herbaceous, landscaping mainstay.  Recommended for dense shade in southern zones and light to dense shade for norther zones. Hosta are versatile East Asian natives with lush foliage in diverse colors, heights, and textures. Perennials.  Sun-Shade: Mostly Sunny to Full Shade Soil Condition: Normal, Acidic.  Zones 3-9.
                                                                                         What are Hosta "eyes"?
When you buy a Hosta "bare-root", you will usually receive 1 or 2 eye plants. Each eye will grow into a full plant.
In the spring, you can gently uncover your hosta beds to reveal the green nubs poking through the soil. Each nub is called an eye, and it is the beginning of a complete set of hosta leaves. Eyes can be divided, but it is not necessary.
When you move or divide hostas, it can take a year or so for them to be completely reestablished.

Hosta (originally named Funkia) is a genus of 23-40 species of lily-like plants native to northeast Asia. It was once classified in the family Liliaceae but is now (due to the Angiosperm Phylogeny Group) included in the family Agavaceae. Hosta are herbaceous perennial plants that grow from corms or rhizomes. Their broad lanceolate (lance-shaped) or ovate leaves vary widely in size, by species, from 1-15 inches long and 3/4 - 12 inches broad. Variation among the numerous cultivars is even greater, with clumps ranging from less than four inches across to more than 6 1/2 feet across.

Wild Hosta species’ leaf color is typically green, although some (e.g. H. sieboldiana) are known for their glaucous coating that lends leaves a blue appearance. There are natural sports (mutations) of native species that have yellow-green (“gold") colored leaves or differing leaf variegation (centers/edges are either white/cream or yellowish). The (3/4- to 2-inch long) flowers are produced on (up to 31-inch tall) erect panicles: they are usually pendulous with six petals, scentless, and white, lavender, or violet in color.

Hostas are widely cultivated groundcovers, and they are particularly useful as shade-tolerant plants. Hybridization has produced over 5000 cultivars: those with golden- or white-variegated leaves are especially prized. They require little care (other than watering and some fertilizer) and are generally easy, long-lived and relatively disease free.

Starting in May we sometimes cut much of the top foliage off our Hostas before shipping. We feel that the tops are too big to be supported by the roots after transplanting, they tend to just lay over on the ground and not recuperate...if we have not cut them back and they start to wilt simply cut them.  When the plants are smaller we leave the tops on.    The genus name Hosta is after the Austrian physician & botanist Nicholas Host (1761-1834).

HOSTA ‘FRANCEE’ LARGE VARIEGATED LEAVES WITH LAVENDER BLOOMS Z 3-9

Hosta f. 'Francee' features large, dark emerald-green, heart-shaped puckered leaves with bright white edges. It is one of the best white-margined hostas for landscapes and provides bright color (in shade) with wonderful foliage.

'Francee' has a medium growth rate; in mid- to late-summer, lavender flowers bloom on 36-inch scapes. This cultivar needs to be planted in full shade in any moist, well-drained area.

A low care perennial, it is a great choice for any beginner gardener. It is one of the most popular for landscapes, in addition to being slug resistant and ideal for shady positions.
HOSTA VENTRICOSA LARGE GREEN PURPLE FLOWER Z 3-9
Base Price: $8.95

Hosta is the most popular perennial in America. Clump-forming, herbaceous, landscaping mainstay.  Recommended for dense shade in southern zones and light to dense shade for norther zones. Hosta are versatile East Asian natives with lush foliage in diverse colors, heights, and textures. Perennials.  Sun-Shade: Mostly Sunny to Full Shade Soil Condition: Normal, Acidic.  Zones 3-9.
                                                                                         What are Hosta "eyes"?
When you buy a Hosta "bare-root", you will usually receive 1 or 2 eye plants. Each eye will grow into a full plant.
In the spring, you can gently uncover your hosta beds to reveal the green nubs poking through the soil. Each nub is called an eye, and it is the beginning of a complete set of hosta leaves. Eyes can be divided, but it is not necessary.
When you move or divide hostas, it can take a year or so for them to be completely reestablished.

Hosta (originally named Funkia) is a genus of 23-40 species of lily-like plants native to northeast Asia. It was once classified in the family Liliaceae but is now (due to the Angiosperm Phylogeny Group) included in the family Agavaceae. Hosta are herbaceous perennial plants that grow from corms or rhizomes. Their broad lanceolate (lance-shaped) or ovate leaves vary widely in size, by species, from 1-15 inches long and 3/4 - 12 inches broad. Variation among the numerous cultivars is even greater, with clumps ranging from less than four inches across to more than 6 1/2 feet across.

Wild Hosta species’ leaf color is typically green, although some (e.g. H. sieboldiana) are known for their glaucous coating that lends leaves a blue appearance. There are natural sports (mutations) of native species that have yellow-green (“gold") colored leaves or differing leaf variegation (centers/edges are either white/cream or yellowish). The (3/4- to 2-inch long) flowers are produced on (up to 31-inch tall) erect panicles: they are usually pendulous with six petals, scentless, and white, lavender, or violet in color.

Hostas are widely cultivated groundcovers, and they are particularly useful as shade-tolerant plants. Hybridization has produced over 5000 cultivars: those with golden- or white-variegated leaves are especially prized. They require little care (other than watering and some fertilizer) and are generally easy, long-lived and relatively disease free.

Starting in May we sometimes cut much of the top foliage off our Hostas before shipping. We feel that the tops are too big to be supported by the roots after transplanting, they tend to just lay over on the ground and not recuperate...if we have not cut them back and they start to wilt simply cut them.  When the plants are smaller we leave the tops on.    The genus name Hosta is after the Austrian physician & botanist Nicholas Host (1761-1834).

HOSTA VENTRICOSA LARGE GREEN PURPLE FLOWER Z 3-9

Hosta ventricosa has gorgeous dark-green leaves: these are especially attractive when grown in rings (around trees) or as a mass planting. It grows quickly and blooms lavishly, with fine lavender blooms on (up to 28-inch high) naked flower scapes.

Very sturdy and dependable, it requires little care. Ventricosa survives summer heat and drought without extra watering. It is attractive to butterflies, and does well in full or partial shade.

Hosta ventricosa is tolerant of a range of conditions (dry, wet, sand and clay): it is more tolerant of direct sun than many other hostas. With ample water, it can tolerate 4-6 hours of sun per day. This plant requires no care and readily self-sows.
GOLD DROP-SMALL GOLDE YELLOW LAVENDER FLOWERS Z 3-9
Base Price: $9.95

GOLD DROP-SMALL GOLD YELLOW LAVENDER FLOWERS Z 3-9 Small, golden yellow. Holds color all season, Lavender Flowers. Mature at 6" x 6".

Hosta is the most popular perennial in America. Clump-forming, herbaceous, landscaping mainstay. Recommended for dense shade in southern zones and light to dense shade for norther zones. Hosta are versatile East Asian natives with lush foliage in diverse colors, heights, and textures. Perennials. Sun-Shade: Mostly Sunny to Full Shade Soil Condition: Normal, Acidic. Zones 3-9. What are Hosta "eyes"? When you buy a Hosta "bare-root", you will usually receive 1 or 2 eye plants. Each eye will grow into a full plant. In the spring, you can gently uncover your hosta beds to reveal the green nubs poking through the soil. Each nub is called an eye, and it is the beginning of a complete set of hosta leaves. Eyes can be divided, but it is not necessary. When you move or divide hostas, it can take a year or so for them to be completely reestablished. Hosta (originally named Funkia) is a genus of 23-40 species of lily-like plants native to northeast Asia. It was once classified in the family Liliaceae but is now (due to the Angiosperm Phylogeny Group) included in the family Agavaceae. Hosta are herbaceous perennial plants that grow from corms or rhizomes. Their broad lanceolate (lance-shaped) or ovate leaves vary widely in size, by species, from 1-15 inches long and 3/4 - 12 inches broad. Variation among the numerous cultivars is even greater, with clumps ranging from less than four inches across to more than 6 1/2 feet across. Wild Hosta species’ leaf color is typically green, although some (e.g. H. sieboldiana) are known for their glaucous coating that lends leaves a blue appearance. There are natural sports (mutations) of native species that have yellow-green (“gold") colored leaves or differing leaf variegation (centers/edges are either white/cream or yellowish). The (3/4- to 2-inch long) flowers are produced on (up to 31-inch tall) erect panicles: they are usually pendulous with six petals, scentless, and white, lavender, or violet in color. Hostas are widely cultivated groundcovers, and they are particularly useful as shade-tolerant plants. Hybridization has produced over 5000 cultivars: those with golden- or white-variegated leaves are especially prized. They require little care (other than watering and some fertilizer) and are generally easy, long-lived and relatively disease free. Starting in May we sometimes cut much of the top foliage off our Hostas before shipping. We feel that the tops are too big to be supported by the roots after transplanting, they tend to just lay over on the ground and not recuperate...if we have not cut them back and they start to wilt simply cut them. When the plants are smaller we leave the tops on. The genus name Hosta is after the Austrian physician & botanist Nicholas Host (1761-1834).
HOSTA GOLDEN TIARA DWARF VARIEGATED LAVENDER BLOOMS Z 3-9
Base Price: $9.95

HOSTA GOLDEN TIARA DWARF VARIEGATED LAVENDER BLOOMS Z 3-9 Hosta 'Golden Tiara' features small, heart-shaped green leaves with chartreuse/golden margins that hold color all season; its lavender flowers bloom on 30-inch scapes. Height: 15 inches by width of 30 inches. Though it has a fast growth rate, Golden Tiara's compact habits make it an outstanding edger. This dwarf Hosta provides wonderful foliage and bright color (in shade). A hardy, low-maintenance perennial, it is also fairly drought tolerant.

Hosta is the most popular perennial in America. Clump-forming, herbaceous, landscaping mainstay. Recommended for dense shade in southern zones and light to dense shade for norther zones. Hosta are versatile East Asian natives with lush foliage in diverse colors, heights, and textures. Perennials. Sun-Shade: Mostly Sunny to Full Shade Soil Condition: Normal, Acidic. Zones 3-9. What are Hosta "eyes"? When you buy a Hosta "bare-root", you will usually receive 1 or 2 eye plants. Each eye will grow into a full plant. In the spring, you can gently uncover your hosta beds to reveal the green nubs poking through the soil. Each nub is called an eye, and it is the beginning of a complete set of hosta leaves. Eyes can be divided, but it is not necessary. When you move or divide hostas, it can take a year or so for them to be completely reestablished. Hosta (originally named Funkia) is a genus of 23-40 species of lily-like plants native to northeast Asia. It was once classified in the family Liliaceae but is now (due to the Angiosperm Phylogeny Group) included in the family Agavaceae. Hosta are herbaceous perennial plants that grow from corms or rhizomes. Their broad lanceolate (lance-shaped) or ovate leaves vary widely in size, by species, from 1-15 inches long and 3/4 - 12 inches broad. Variation among the numerous cultivars is even greater, with clumps ranging from less than four inches across to more than 6 1/2 feet across. Wild Hosta species’ leaf color is typically green, although some (e.g. H. sieboldiana) are known for their glaucous coating that lends leaves a blue appearance. There are natural sports (mutations) of native species that have yellow-green (“gold") colored leaves or differing leaf variegation (centers/edges are either white/cream or yellowish). The (3/4- to 2-inch long) flowers are produced on (up to 31-inch tall) erect panicles: they are usually pendulous with six petals, scentless, and white, lavender, or violet in color. Hostas are widely cultivated groundcovers, and they are particularly useful as shade-tolerant plants. Hybridization has produced over 5000 cultivars: those with golden- or white-variegated leaves are especially prized. They require little care (other than watering and some fertilizer) and are generally easy, long-lived and relatively disease free. Starting in May we sometimes cut much of the top foliage off our Hostas before shipping. We feel that the tops are too big to be supported by the roots after transplanting, they tend to just lay over on the ground and not recuperate...if we have not cut them back and they start to wilt simply cut them. When the plants are smaller we leave the tops on. The genus name Hosta is after the Austrian physician & botanist Nicholas Host (1761-1834).
HOSTA PLANTAGINEA ‘ROYAL STANDARD’ lily-like white flowers Z 3-9
Base Price: $9.95

HOSTA PLANTAGINEA ‘ROYAL STANDARD’ lily-like white flowers Z 3-9

Like most hostas, 'Royal Standard' is treasured for its foliage and large, rich, dark-green, heart-shaped leaves (that pucker when mature). It is also popular for its sweetly scented, lily-like white flowers that bloom on 30- to 40-inch scapes. It is unusual in its genus, due to its ability to thrive in sunny positions.

A dependable and versatile perennial that is low-maintenance and easy to grow, it is primarily grown because its beautiful foliage provides color, contrast, and texture to any landscape. This hosta is attractive to butterflies and its dense foliage crowds out garden weeds.

Hosta 'Royal Standard' is a great garden plant because it is a long-term survivor and grows in a wide array of conditions. It is easy in average (to medium) well-drained soils in full sun - or even all the way to full shade. However, soil should be kept moist (especially in hot and sunny conditions). It is a fast grower, adapts to most soils, and tolerates heat and drought better than most other hostas. In addition, it performs well in full sun (though it prefers some shade in southern climates).


Hosta is the most popular perennial in America. Clump-forming, herbaceous, landscaping mainstay. Recommended for dense shade in southern zones and light to dense shade for norther zones. Hosta are versatile East Asian natives with lush foliage in diverse colors, heights, and textures. Perennials. Sun-Shade: Mostly Sunny to Full Shade Soil Condition: Normal, Acidic. Zones 3-9. What are Hosta "eyes"? When you buy a Hosta "bare-root", you will usually receive 1 or 2 eye plants. Each eye will grow into a full plant. In the spring, you can gently uncover your hosta beds to reveal the green nubs poking through the soil. Each nub is called an eye, and it is the beginning of a complete set of hosta leaves. Eyes can be divided, but it is not necessary. When you move or divide hostas, it can take a year or so for them to be completely reestablished. Hosta (originally named Funkia) is a genus of 23-40 species of lily-like plants native to northeast Asia. It was once classified in the family Liliaceae but is now (due to the Angiosperm Phylogeny Group) included in the family Agavaceae. Hosta are herbaceous perennial plants that grow from corms or rhizomes. Their broad lanceolate (lance-shaped) or ovate leaves vary widely in size, by species, from 1-15 inches long and 3/4 - 12 inches broad. Variation among the numerous cultivars is even greater, with clumps ranging from less than four inches across to more than 6 1/2 feet across. Wild Hosta species’ leaf color is typically green, although some (e.g. H. sieboldiana) are known for their glaucous coating that lends leaves a blue appearance. There are natural sports (mutations) of native species that have yellow-green (“gold") colored leaves or differing leaf variegation (centers/edges are either white/cream or yellowish). The (3/4- to 2-inch long) flowers are produced on (up to 31-inch tall) erect panicles: they are usually pendulous with six petals, scentless, and white, lavender, or violet in color. Hostas are widely cultivated groundcovers, and they are particularly useful as shade-tolerant plants. Hybridization has produced over 5000 cultivars: those with golden- or white-variegated leaves are especially prized. They require little care (other than watering and some fertilizer) and are generally easy, long-lived and relatively disease free. Starting in May we sometimes cut much of the top foliage off our Hostas before shipping. We feel that the tops are too big to be supported by the roots after transplanting, they tend to just lay over on the ground and not recuperate...if we have not cut them back and they start to wilt simply cut them. When the plants are smaller we leave the tops on. The genus name Hosta is after the Austrian physician & botanist Nicholas Host (1761-1834).
HOSTA SIEBOLDIANA 'FRANCES WILLIAMS' BLUISH-GREEN GOLD MARGINS LAVENDER BLOOM Z 3-9
Base Price: $15.95

HOSTA SIEBOLDIANA 'FRANCES WILLIAMS' BLUISH-GREEN GOLD MARGINS LAVENDER BLOOM Z 3-9

As one of the most dramatic hostas, 'Frances Williams' features large, bluish-green, puckered leaves that have striking, uneven golden edges. They are heart-shaped, grow to salad plate size, and remain brightly colored all season.

Variegated selections (such as this groundcover) brighten up the darkest corner of any shady garden. In July-August, this plant bears pale lavender flowers on 40-inch scapes. It has a moderate growth rate, requires shade in southern zones, and is more resistant to slugs than most other hostas.

'Frances Williams' prefers moist well-drained rich soil in shade or bright shade, but adapts well to less than ideal conditions, including drought, considerable sunlight, and poor soil. Too much direct sun can scorch the leaves, but it can take more sunlight than most people realize. This low-care perennial is one of the most popular for landscape uses and is a great choice for any beginner gardener.

The species is named for the German physician and botanist Philipp Franz von Siebold (1796-1866), who sparked interest in hostas in the early 1800s after he returned to the Netherlands with several specimens he had collected during his long stint as a physician in Japan.

The cultivar is named for Mrs. Frances Ropes Williams (1883-1969) of Massachusetts, who spotted the first known specimen when it appeared in a field of H. sieboldiana at Bristol Nurseries in Connecticut, in 1936.



Hosta is the most popular perennial in America. Clump-forming, herbaceous, landscaping mainstay. Recommended for dense shade in southern zones and light to dense shade for norther zones. Hosta are versatile East Asian natives with lush foliage in diverse colors, heights, and textures. Perennials. Sun-Shade: Mostly Sunny to Full Shade Soil Condition: Normal, Acidic. Zones 3-9. What are Hosta "eyes"? When you buy a Hosta "bare-root", you will usually receive 1 or 2 eye plants. Each eye will grow into a full plant. In the spring, you can gently uncover your hosta beds to reveal the green nubs poking through the soil. Each nub is called an eye, and it is the beginning of a complete set of hosta leaves. Eyes can be divided, but it is not necessary. When you move or divide hostas, it can take a year or so for them to be completely reestablished. Hosta (originally named Funkia) is a genus of 23-40 species of lily-like plants native to northeast Asia. It was once classified in the family Liliaceae but is now (due to the Angiosperm Phylogeny Group) included in the family Agavaceae. Hosta are herbaceous perennial plants that grow from corms or rhizomes. Their broad lanceolate (lance-shaped) or ovate leaves vary widely in size, by species, from 1-15 inches long and 3/4 - 12 inches broad. Variation among the numerous cultivars is even greater, with clumps ranging from less than four inches across to more than 6 1/2 feet across. Wild Hosta species’ leaf color is typically green, although some (e.g. H. sieboldiana) are known for their glaucous coating that lends leaves a blue appearance. There are natural sports (mutations) of native species that have yellow-green (“gold") colored leaves or differing leaf variegation (centers/edges are either white/cream or yellowish). The (3/4- to 2-inch long) flowers are produced on (up to 31-inch tall) erect panicles: they are usually pendulous with six petals, scentless, and white, lavender, or violet in color. Hostas are widely cultivated groundcovers, and they are particularly useful as shade-tolerant plants. Hybridization has produced over 5000 cultivars: those with golden- or white-variegated leaves are especially prized. They require little care (other than watering and some fertilizer) and are generally easy, long-lived and relatively disease free. Starting in May we sometimes cut much of the top foliage off our Hostas before shipping. We feel that the tops are too big to be supported by the roots after transplanting, they tend to just lay over on the ground and not recuperate...if we have not cut them back and they start to wilt simply cut them. When the plants are smaller we leave the tops on. The genus name Hosta is after the Austrian physician & botanist Nicholas Host (1761-1834).
HOSTA SUM AND SUBSTANCE EX-LARGE GOLD LEAVES LAVENDER FLOWERS Z 3-9
Base Price: $15.95

Hosta is the most popular perennial in America. Clump-forming, herbaceous, landscaping mainstay.  Recommended for dense shade in southern zones and light to dense shade for norther zones. Hosta are versatile East Asian natives with lush foliage in diverse colors, heights, and textures. Perennials.  Sun-Shade: Mostly Sunny to Full Shade Soil Condition: Normal, Acidic.  Zones 3-9.
                                                                                         What are Hosta "eyes"?
When you buy a Hosta "bare-root", you will usually receive 1 or 2 eye plants. Each eye will grow into a full plant.
In the spring, you can gently uncover your hosta beds to reveal the green nubs poking through the soil. Each nub is called an eye, and it is the beginning of a complete set of hosta leaves. Eyes can be divided, but it is not necessary.
When you move or divide hostas, it can take a year or so for them to be completely reestablished.

Hosta (originally named Funkia) is a genus of 23-40 species of lily-like plants native to northeast Asia. It was once classified in the family Liliaceae but is now (due to the Angiosperm Phylogeny Group) included in the family Agavaceae. Hosta are herbaceous perennial plants that grow from corms or rhizomes. Their broad lanceolate (lance-shaped) or ovate leaves vary widely in size, by species, from 1-15 inches long and 3/4 - 12 inches broad. Variation among the numerous cultivars is even greater, with clumps ranging from less than four inches across to more than 6 1/2 feet across.

Wild Hosta species’ leaf color is typically green, although some (e.g. H. sieboldiana) are known for their glaucous coating that lends leaves a blue appearance. There are natural sports (mutations) of native species that have yellow-green (“gold") colored leaves or differing leaf variegation (centers/edges are either white/cream or yellowish). The (3/4- to 2-inch long) flowers are produced on (up to 31-inch tall) erect panicles: they are usually pendulous with six petals, scentless, and white, lavender, or violet in color.

Hostas are widely cultivated groundcovers, and they are particularly useful as shade-tolerant plants. Hybridization has produced over 5000 cultivars: those with golden- or white-variegated leaves are especially prized. They require little care (other than watering and some fertilizer) and are generally easy, long-lived and relatively disease free.

Starting in May we sometimes cut much of the top foliage off our Hostas before shipping. We feel that the tops are too big to be supported by the roots after transplanting, they tend to just lay over on the ground and not recuperate...if we have not cut them back and they start to wilt simply cut them.  When the plants are smaller we leave the tops on.    The genus name Hosta is after the Austrian physician & botanist Nicholas Host (1761-1834).

HOSTA SUM AND SUBSTANCE EX-LARGE GOLD LEAVES LAVENDER FLOWERS Z 3-9

Heavy light green leaves make a striking display and are enhanced with lavender flowers in late summer!
We hear more and more raves about the performance of this huge-leaved cultivar. Heavy, 2-foot light green leaves make a striking display, enhanced by lavender flowers in late summer. A strong grower in half sun. 3 feet tall and 5 feet wide. Quite slug- and snail-resistant.
The artistic beauty and richness of Hosta foliage, unequaled in any other shade-loving plant, is being recognized more widely every year. The bold, colorful, and often fragrant flowers are excellent for cutting, as are the leaves. Hostas are a must for any shady planting, and many perform well in sun, too. They are magnificent in combination with ferns, creating a marvelous contrast in texture and color. Zone 3-9

Genus Hosta
Variety Sum and Substance
Zone 3 - 9
Bloom Season Early Summer
Habit Mound-shaped
Plant Height 3 ft
Plant Width 5 ft
Additional Characteristics Easy Care Plants
Bloom Color Lavender
Foliage Color Chartreuse, Light Green
Light Requirements Part Shade
Resistance Pest Resistant
Season Of Interest Summer
Soil Tolerance Normal,  loamy
Uses Beds, Border, Ornamental, Outdoor